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Old 03-17-2013, 01:16 PM
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Panicked Europeans Rush ATMs as Leaders Move To Seize Funds From Bank Account Holders

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Over the last few years political and financial leaders in Europe and the United States have implemented policies, regulations and bailouts costing global taxpayers trillions of dollars with the promise that these measures would lead to economic growth and recovery.

What happened in Europe today is yet further proof that nothing they’ve done has fixed the underlying fundamental issues surrounding the events that led to the crash of 2008.

For those who don’t believe the government is prepared to take extreme measures that may include the seizing of retirement accounts, cash savings or even gold, look no further than Cyprus, the latest recipient of bank bailouts.

As of right now, citizens of Cyprus are scrambling to withdraw funds from their bank accounts after the EU, with agreement from the Cypriot government, announced they will decimate funds held in personal bank accounts to the tune of up to 10% of existing deposits.

You read that right.

The European Union has made the determination that the people of Cyprus are now responsible for the hundreds of billions of dollars in bad bets made by their government and bank financiers, and they are moving to confiscate money directly from the bank accounts of every citizen in the country.
http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-new...lders_03162013

Here is an example of people rushing to cash out their money from ATMs.

[YT]-G3Jz-oi5qw[/YT]

Any thought on this matter?
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Old 03-17-2013, 01:20 PM
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Cypriot Bailout: A German Victory that Threatens to Unleash Chaos

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The Cypriot bailout agreed in the earlier hours of Saturday morning could be a game changer for the eurozone. It was a resounding victory for Germany, but the compromise reached could see banks collapse across Southern Europe.

Cyprus places Germany in a dilemma. The country needs a bailout of around €17 billion to avoid going bankrupt. To German elites, this is a great opportunity to gain control of one of the world’s most strategic pieces of real estate. But ordinary German taxpayers don’t care about this. They don’t want their money going to what they believe is a crooked banking system.

Saturday’s decision allows Germany to have its cake and eat it. The meeting of eurozone finance ministers decided to loan Cyprus €10 billion. The International Monetary Fund (imf) will probably also join in. But the bailout comes with a shocking and unprecedented condition.

Cypriots will have money taken directly out of their bank accounts. Monday is a bank holiday in Cyprus. By the time banks open on Tuesday, all depositors will have a chunk taken out of their account. Accounts with less than €100,000 will face a levy of 6.75 percent. Those with more, will be taxed at 9.9 percent.

This decision blurs the line between taxation and theft. If you had $10,000 of savings in a bank account—that you had already paid tax on—the government would take $675.

Even government members were surprised. “My initial reaction is one of shock,” said the head of parliamentary financial affairs committee, Nicholas Papadopoulos. “This decision is much worse than what we expected and contrary to what the government was assuring us, right up until last night,” he told Reuters. The current leadership has constantly promised there would be no tax on bank deposits. They have been forced into total surrender by Germany.
http://www.thetrumpet.com/article/10...-unleash-chaos

Is the falling domino effect starting in the Euro zone?
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Old 03-17-2013, 01:41 PM
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In the same topic, you may be interested to watch Nigel Farage

[YT]V72mZCDwmY0[/YT]
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Old 03-17-2013, 02:34 PM
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Are those actions within the treaty guidelines?

If so it was some really stupid people who signed those agreements.
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Old 03-17-2013, 04:16 PM
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Are those actions within the treaty guidelines?

If so it was some really stupid people who signed those agreements.
Many actions within the treaty guidelines, and if they see a problem for the ECB, they change it. In the mean time, it is just getting worse and worse for the people who pay the bills for incompetence.

Make no mistake, here in US, they will probably do the same thing to resolve the huge deficit.
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Old 03-17-2013, 05:01 PM
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After The Banksters Steal Money From Bank Accounts In Cyprus They Will Start Doing It EVERYWHERE

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Cyprus is a beta test. The banksters are trying to commit bank robbery in broad daylight, and they are eager to see if the rest of the world will let them get away with it. Cyprus was probably chosen because it is very small (therefore nobody will care too much about it) and because there is a lot of foreign (i.e. Russian) money parked there. The IMF and the EU could have easily bailed out Cyprus without any trouble whatsoever, but they purposely decided not to do that. Instead, they decided that this would be a great time to test the idea of a "wealth tax".

The government of Cyprus was given two options by the IMF and the EU - either they could confiscate money from private bank accounts or they could leave the eurozone. Apparently this was presented as a "take it or leave it" proposition, and many are using the world "blackmail" to describe what has happened. Sadly, this decision is going to set a very ominous precedent for the future and it is going to have ripple effects far beyond Cyprus. After the banksters steal money from bank accounts in Cyprus they will start doing it everywhere.

If this "bank robbery" goes well, it will only be a matter of time before depositors in nations such as Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal are asked to take "haircuts" as well. And what will happen one day when the U.S. financial system collapses? Will U.S. bank accounts also be hit with a "one time" wealth tax? That is very frightening to think about.

Cyprus is a very small nation, so it is not the amount of money involved that is such a big deal. Rather, the reason why this is all so troubling is that this "wealth tax" is shattering confidence in the European banking system. Never before have the banksters come directly after bank accounts.

If everything goes according to plan, every bank account in Cyprus will be hit with a "one time fee" this week. Accounts with less than 100,000 euros will be hit with a 6.75% tax, and accounts with more than 100,000 euros will be hit with a 9.9% tax.

How would you feel if something like this happened where you live?

How would you feel if the banksters suddenly demanded that you hand over 10 percent of all the money that you had in the bank?

And why would anyone want to still put money into the bank in nations such as Greece, Italy, Spain or Portugal after all of this?

One writer for Forbes has called this "probably the single most inexplicably irresponsible decision in banking supervision in the advanced world since the 1930s." And I would agree with that statement. I certainly did not expect to see anything like this in Europe. This is going to cause people to pull money out of banks all over the continent. If I was living in Europe (and especially if I was living in one of the more financially-troubled countries) that is exactly what I would be doing.

The bank runs that we witnessed in Cyprus over the weekend may just be a preview of what is coming. When this "wealth tax" was announced, it triggered a run on the ATMs and many of them ran out of cash very rapidly. A bank holiday was declared for Monday, and all electronic transfers of money were banned.

Needless to say, the people of Cyprus were not too pleased about all of this. In fact, one very angry man actually parked his bulldozer outside of one bank branch and threatened to physically bulldoze his way inside.

But this robbery by the banksters has not been completed yet. First, the Cypriot Parliament must approve the new law authorizing this wealth confiscation on Monday. If it is approved, then the actually wealth confiscation will take place on Tuesday morning.

According to Reuters, the new president of Cyprus is warning that if the bank account tax is not approved the two largest banks in Cyprus will collapse and there will be complete and total financial chaos in his country...

President Nicos Anastasiades, elected three weeks ago with a pledge to negotiate a swift bailout, said refusal to agree to terms would have led to the collapse of the two largest banks.

"On Tuesday ... We would either choose the catastrophic scenario of disorderly bankruptcy or the scenario of a painful but controlled management of the crisis," Anastasiades said in written statement.

In several statements since his election, he had previously categorically ruled out a deposit haircut.
Read the entire article there: http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/a...-it-everywhere
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Old 03-17-2013, 05:46 PM
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When it comes down to it, many American corporations were involved in the creation of the Euro, especially getting the poorer countries admitted. Lots of Americans profiting from all this. Just more insiders making money due to lack of oversight, banks that are too big to fail, and loopholes.
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by dvduval View Post
When it comes down to it, many American corporations were involved in the creation of the Euro, especially getting the poorer countries admitted. Lots of Americans profiting from all this. Just more insiders making money due to lack of oversight, banks that are too big to fail, and loopholes.
I am sure that many American corporations were involved in the euro, including Goldman Sachs, and may others.

The European propaganda was that the Europe was builded to compete with the US, in fact it wasn't the truth. The agenda is the NWO starting from Europe, then all continents with one world government owned by the bankers.

You certainly know like me that the bankers are the master puppeters who pull the strings of the world.

So, in Europe they are pretty well advanced to still all the wealth from people and here in US, I believe that the policies are to fill the gaps with the European economic policies, that's why for me it is a deja vu.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:47 AM
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Attention! Attention!
This is only a TEST! I repeat... This is only a TEST!

If this had been a real emergency bank robbery, we would have chosen a much wealthier country, like England or the USofA.
Nothing to see here, folks! Get back to work!
 
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:36 AM
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Natural can't believe you've missed a key part in the news... Majority of the deposits that is being taxed at high rate belongs to Russian oligarhs who use Cyprus as safe heaven. Russia actually already gave Cyprus 2,5 billion bailout money. Even Britain supports this measure, and they usually don't support anything European

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If this had been a real emergency bank robbery, we would have chosen a much wealthier country, like England or the USofA.
Nothing to see here, folks! Get back to work!
 
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:43 AM
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It's all politics and games

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Mr Putin, at a meeting with economic advisers on Monday, was among several Russian leaders to criticise the bailout, which came without consultation with Moscow and could cost Russian depositors up to €2bn, according to Nicosia bankers.

“While assessing the proposed additional levy on bank accounts in Cyprus, Mr Putin said that such a decision, should it be made, would be unfair, unprofessional and dangerous,” the president’s spokesman said following the meeting.
Source
 
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by kju385 View Post
Natural can't believe you've missed a key part in the news... Majority of the deposits that is being taxed at high rate belongs to Russian oligarhs who use Cyprus as safe heaven. Russia actually already gave Cyprus 2,5 billion bailout money. Even Britain supports this measure, and they usually don't support anything European

Do you think I missed something? I think you didn't read the article I posted

Let me try again, post #2 article http://www.thetrumpet.com/article/10...-unleash-chaos

If you had taken the time to read this article, you will learn that:

"The meeting of eurozone finance ministers decided to loan Cyprus €10 billion"

and

Russia will also chip in by extending a €2.5 billion loan that it already gave Cyprus
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:57 AM
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German Commerzbank Suggests Wealth Tax In Italy Next

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While some argue that Cyprus was "one of the biggest money-washing machines for Russian criminals," and others that Cyprus ex-Pat community and energy resources brough deposits (not to say their high deposit interest rates), it seems the European Union (IMF et al.) have decided that the route to crisis stabilization, just as we outlined here over a year ago and updated here, is through a wealth tax.

However, as Handelsblatt reports, the gross distortions of wealth distribution among both core and peripheral nations (evident in the chasm between 'mean' and 'median' net assets - or wealth) makes some nations more 'capable' of 'giving' and as Commerzbank's chief economist notes, median wealth in Italy is EUR164,000 (as opposed to Austria's median of around EUR76,000 and mean of around EUR265,000) meaning that in theory Italy has no debt crisis (with net assets at 173% of GDP) - significantly more than the Germans at 124% - "so it would make sense, in Italy a one-time property tax levy," he suggested.

"A tax rate of 15% on financial assets would probably be enough to push the Italian government debt to below the critical level of 100% of gross domestic product." So there you have it, the 'new deal' in Europe, as we warned, is 'wealth taxes' and testing the "capacity of Cypriots" appears to be the strawman on what the public will take before social unrest becomes intolerable.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-0...tax-italy-next

Do you think that IMF bank and Co are staging civil unrest by racketing the bank deposit accounts of the people in euro zone?
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Old 03-18-2013, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Natural Elements View Post
Do you think I missed something? I think you didn't read the article I posted

If you had taken the time to read this article, you will learn that:
I did read at least ten articles on the subject, including your sample. Mainly because I'm considering writing an article on the subject since I have a website on personal savings

All the right facts were said, the motives behind the action are what's interesting. Not many in Europe are happy with the influence of banksters, especially international ones doing business here. Looking the bigger picture, EU budget has been cut for the first time. Criteria for fund withdrawal has been raised quite a bit. I know this from experience. And some of the countries still refuse to change their ways. My guess is that this is as Zap stated "not a real robbery", in other words a message to countries with larger debt to get their finances in order while slapping Russia as a bonus.

Of course, Germany has a strong interest in getting nationatial budgets in eurozone straight. They are the biggest lender and naturally they want to minimise future risk (or protect existing investments) following conservative investment policies.

Quote:
Do you think that IMF bank and Co are staging civil unrest by racketing the bank deposit accounts of the people in euro zone?
IMF is always playing their games. They announced policy change, saying that they'll become less insistant on cuts, yet that is the first thing they seek. I don't think they have had much influence in this though, but who knows.
 
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:41 PM
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@ kju385 - Did you read this one too?

New Phase in the Global Financial Crisis: EU Summit Sparks Run on Cyprus Banks

Quote:
It took until Saturday morning for the European summit to agree to a much reduced €10 billion ($13 billion) loan to bail out the banks in Cyprus, the fifth euro zone country after Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain to apply for aid.

Within hours, the decision to levy a tax on Cyprus bank deposits to pay for the rescue package resulted in a stampede to withdraw cash from the country’s banks via ATMs.

The EU’s aim is to raise €6 billion by levying a one-off 10 percent tax on savings over €100,000 and a 6.75 percent tax on small depositors. Senior bank bondholders and investors in Cyprus’ sovereign debt will be left untouched.

The response of the financial magazine Forbes was scathing, denouncing the “German-led group of EU officials” for “probably the single most inexplicably irresponsible decision in banking supervision in the advanced world since the 1930s.” Another Forbes columnist entitled his comment, “Welcome to Another Great Depression.” Business Insider noted the “multiple reports which indicated that Germany told Cyprus: Confiscate your depositors’ money or leave the euro zone. That’s a terrible political dynamic, and on top of Italy it exacerbates a bad overall political situation.”

The summit was the first to be held following elections in Italy that recorded a decisive “no” vote against the austerity policies imposed by the technocratic government of Mario Monti and the European Union (EU).

With Italy still lacking a viable government, Monti, in his role as caretaker leader, appealed to EU leaders to soften their austerity course or face the same fate. In a letter to the summit, he declared that the election result showed “public support for the reforms, and worse, for the European Union, is dramatically declining” as part of a “trend which is also visible in many other countries across the Union.”

Luxembourg Prime Minister and European Council President Jean-Claude Juncker warned at the start of the summit, “I have big worries about the coming economic developments. I won’t exclude that we run the risk of a social revolution, a social rebellion.”

French President Francois Hollande, whose implementation of strict budgetary measures has led to an unprecedented plunge in his popularity ratings, urged leniency for France after Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici warned that the EU’s actions “risk a loss of social and political confidence across Europe.”

Germany led the way in opposing any shift, with Bundesbank head Jens Weidmann warning, “The deficit countries must act. They must address their structural weaknesses. They must become more competitive and they must increase their exports.”

The head of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, was equally adamant that there be no change of course. In two separate speeches Thursday he addressed the 27 leaders of the EU and the 17 members of the euro zone on the need to further drive down their labour costs and increase productivity. German Chancellor Angela Merkel declared that Draghi’s “very interesting” reports made clear that it was “productivity levels and wages in a number of countries that were responsible for the high unemployment today.”

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) stepped in to insist that what was required was not less austerity for the working class, but more money for the bankers. It issued a 69-page report on the second day of the summit warning that hundreds of billions of euros in toxic loans remained on the books of European banks and that further action was needed to shore up the continent’s financial sector.

The IMF report, commissioned by the EU, declared that priority had to be given to “moving banks and sovereigns jointly to safety.”

In the end, France secured what was reported to be a concession for itself and Italy. The summit’s concluding statement acknowledged “possibilities offered by the EU’s existing fiscal framework to balance productive public investment needs with fiscal discipline objectives” within the Stability and Growth Pact. The statement added, however, that any such leeway would have to be approved by the European Commission and fellow euro zone states.

Germany carried the day not merely because it is Europe’s strongest economy, but because its demands echoed most closely those of major financial institutions and global speculators.

Once again, as has been the case in the numerous European summits held since the onset of the global financial crisis five years ago, European leaders, under pressure from the financial elite, dropped or sidelined calls for “growth.” The subordination of the EU to the banks was summed up by European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, who denied that fostering employment and growth was the task of governments. “Growth and jobs are not things governments can buy or summon,” he said in his concluding remarks.

“We are all fully conscious of the debate, the mounting frustrations and even despair of the people,” he told the media. “We also know there are no easy answers. The only way out of the crisis is to keep tackling its root causes.”
http://www.globalresearch.ca/new-pha...-banks/5327198
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Old 03-19-2013, 04:18 AM
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Oe interesting point to come out of this is that over 2 billion pound was taken out from the banks by the Russians, just days before the government froze the accounts.

Corrupt politicians? Maybe but most likely to be laundered money by certain organizations.

Again, always the poor guy that suffers!
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Old 03-19-2013, 04:44 AM
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Oe interesting point to come out of this is that over 2 billion pound was taken out from the banks by the Russians, just days before the government froze the accounts.

Corrupt politicians? Maybe but most likely to be laundered money by certain organizations.

Again, always the poor guy that suffers!
One could argue that the rich don't get that way by being stupid with their money.
They probably saw the writing on the wall long ago. The timing of just days before is suspect, though.
And, if I had any money in a French, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, Irish or Spanish bank, I'd be taking it all out right now!
Don't wait for the theft to come your way.
In fact, I wouldn't trust any bank or government right now. And I wouldn't trust my money to either.
 
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Old 03-19-2013, 05:45 AM
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If I were the paranoid type, I might be calling the timing of this into question and thinking it was more like a test than a glitch...

http://www.networkworld.com/news/201..._am_2013-03-19

Quote:
Customers of JPMorgan Chase reported seeing zero balances in their accounts both online and on mobile, and speculated that the bank's systems had been hacked into.

The bank however clarified late Monday that it was having a technology problem regarding customers' balance information that it was working to resolve.
If I were hopelessly asleep, I might just write it off as an unfortunate coincidence.
 
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:44 AM
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Cyprus savings raid could trigger bank runs across Europe

Bank runs and financial panic could spread across Europe after Cyprus proposed raiding people's savings for a new bail-out, Alistair Darling has said.

Branches of Cypriot banks remain closed in Athens amid EU bailout talks that have sparked enormous public anger and have led to cash withdrawals

Quote:
The former Chancellor said Cyprus is doing "everything you should not do" after the tiny country decided to seize around 6.75 per cent from smaller deposits and almost 10 per cent from larger ones.

The country is currently deciding whether to make richer savers pay a bigger proportion of the bill but Mr Darling said the whole idea of taking money from ordinary savers is dangerous.

He said EU should not be letting Cyprus "blow apart" the principle of protecting deposits under €100,000, as people will start pulling their cash out of banks if they fear this elsewhere.

"It seems to me to make it more likely that if you’re a saver in Spain or Italy, if you have a sniff of the EU or the IMF coming your way you’ll take your money out and you’ll get a run on the bank," he told BBC Radio Four's Today programme.

"So what they’re doing is everything you should not do when you’re trying to solve a problem like this."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/f...ss-Europe.html
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by G10 View Post
Oe interesting point to come out of this is that over 2 billion pound was taken out from the banks by the Russians, just days before the government froze the accounts.

Corrupt politicians? Maybe but most likely to be laundered money by certain organizations.

Again, always the poor guy that suffers!
Becareful, the mainstream media is very good at demonizing and at cover ups.

Remember in December when HSBC took a $2 billion fine for laundering money? The mainstream media didn't linger on the subject...

And the saga is not finished yet:

Argentina Accuses HSBC of Evading Taxes & Laundering Money
http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/mon...ndering-money/
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