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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2010, 11:22 PM
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Your Favorite Recipes

I would love to have our own collection of V7N recipes from different cultures all over the world. We are going to have some special rules for this thread so please read the whole thread before responding.
  • You cannot go off searching for a recipe online to just copy and paste here. These need to be fairly unique recipes that you have personally cooked (or an old family recipe) that would like to share with us.
  • It may be a recipe that you have added to or re-created to suit your own taste.
  • Extra points if you take a picture of the completed recipe!
Get to it now! I am hungry!
 

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Old 01-06-2010, 05:20 AM
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Hi, Cricket!
I try to keep to a healthy diet, so most of my favorite recipies are with some vegetables or fruits.So hope you'll like my version of salad
so you'll need some caviar or salmon, cucumbers, tomatos, green salad, and any other vegetable you like(I chose different ones every time), cut it all, then add some salt, pepper, olive oil, and one more thing-a bit smashed apple and banana.Then mix it all and enjoy the taste!
 
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Old 01-06-2010, 02:52 PM
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I have my two own dish that i usually cook when i want to..
I called it "Tuna Omelet" and "Corned Beef Omelet"

For Tuna Omelet, ingredients:
1 can of tuna (Century Tuna, hot and spicy flavor)
1 egg
1 calamondin orange
2 chili

Procedure:
First you beat the egg after that add the tuna and add the Philippine lemon and the 2 chili..
Second add cooking oil to the pan and wait until it is hot..
After that pour your egg mixture to the fan with just a low heat because you don't want to overcooked your omelet..
And the best part of cooking is to taste it and eat it..Enjoy!

For Corned Beef Omelet, ingredients:
1 can of corned beef (mine i used Purefoods)
2 eggs
1 potato (chop it to small cubes)
2 chili (if you want to make it spicy)

Procedure: (It is almost the same as the Tuna Omelet)
First you beat the egg after that add the corned beef and the 2 chili..
Second add cooking oil to the pan and wait until it is hot..
After that pour your egg mixture to the fan with just a low heat because you don't want to overcooked your omelet..
And the best part of cooking is to taste it and eat it..Enjoy!

Last edited by BlackEyes; 01-06-2010 at 02:58 PM.
 
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:18 PM
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One of our favorites!

Taco Lasagne
1 lb. Ground Beef
˝ Onion
˝ Green Pepper (diced)
15 oz. Tomato Sauce
˝ pkg. Dry Taco Mix
4 oz. Shredded Cheddar Cheese
4 oz. Mozzarella Cheese (shredded)
Soft Flour Tortillas

Optional: Lettuce, fresh tomatoes, taco sauce/salad dressing.


Instructions:

Brown meat, onion and green pepper. Drain. Add tomato sauce and taco mix. Simmer for 5 minutes. Spray a 9X13 inch pan. Layer the ingredients starting with tortillas, meat mixture, and cheese. Repeat, ending with the cheese. Repeat ending with the cheese. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes or until bubbly and cheese has melted. Serve with chopped lettuce, tomato, onions, and shredded cheese. Top with taco sauce or salad dressing of your choice.
 
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:09 PM
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Bruce's Best Almond Cookies
Ingredients
* 1/2 cup butter, softened
* 1/2 cup white sugar
* 1 egg
* 1 cup all-purpose flour
* 1 cup ground baked almonds
* 2 teaspoons kirschwasser
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2. In large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar. Beat in the egg, kirschwasser, and almonds. Gradually mix in the flour until well blended. Place by spoonful on cookie sheet; flatten slightly with the bottom of a glass.
3. Bake 8 to 10 minutes in the preheated oven or until cookies are lightly colored.
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:43 PM
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One of my favorite easy to make meals.

Pork Chops with Blue Cheese Gravy

Ingredients

2 tablespoons butter
4 thick center cut pork chops
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 cup whipping cream
3 ounces crumbled blue cheese

Directions

1. Melt 2 tbsp butter in a 12" cast iron skillet, over medium heat. Season the pork chops with fresh ground black pepper and minced garlic. Fry the chops in butter until no longer pink and the juices run clear, about 20 to 25 minutes. Turn occasionally to brown evenly.

2. Remove chops to a plate and keep warm. Stir the whipping cream into the skillet, loosening any bits of meat stuck to the bottom with a wooden spoon. Stir in blue cheese. Cook, stirring constantly until sauce thickens, about 8 minutes. Pour sauce over warm pork chops.
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:13 PM
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My apologies up front for this being a cut & paste from a post I made elsewhere... but my day has been on the wild side and I dont have the will to think.
=====

CHILE AGAIN:
The mix I did tonite has the usual screwups that happen when I do this without Beth (aka: TheBride) home. In this case I had the beef browned & drained and had everything but the beef and the onions in the stew pot.

I'd just tossed in the onions when I realized I hadnt sauteed them yet... so I fished out what I could and sauteed onions with everything that came out with them... and of corse I have probably half a cup of unsauteed onions still in the mix. Should taste very distinctive. Also forgot to salt 'em, so I added a little "Janes Crazy Mixed-Up Salt" to the entire mix post facto.

This Brings Up an Important Point
You can get away with adding just damn near anything to chile provided you claim it was done on purpose. This may involve the ability to lie and smile while eating the equivalent of roadkill, but it is an important skill to master. It is not important that you may in fact use it tomorrow to kill a particularly stubborn tree stump... the crucial thing is that you look convincing while declaring that it is just what you were trying to achieve.

[NOTE: This may take practice and a surgical alteration to your gag reflex.]

THE MAIN INGREDIENTS:
IN SKILLET
2 lbs burger (brown & drain)

IN SKILLET
1 Onion (diced) ... salt & Saute' (not caramelize) in Canola oil

IN BIG POT
  • 1 can rotelle (with juice)
  • 2 cans red kidney beans (drained & rinsed)
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (drained)
  • 1 can tomatoe paste
  • 1 can Hunts Zesty & Spicy Tomatoe Sauce
  • 1 TSP Garlic Powder
  • 1 TBSP Sorghum
Add meat, onions, chile powder mix to the big pot mix. (a few TSP, add some more slowly as you cook). Grind tellicherry pepper (course) over the whole thing, folding the ingredients. Cook all day... covered... LOW heat. Go stir it and add additional chile mix to it every so often until seasoning tastes right.

And from a prior post...
Quote:
THE CHILE MIX:
  • * 1/4 cup red New Mexico chile powder
  • * 2 tablespoons ground cumin (smells like heaven)
  • * 2 tablespoons Mexican oregano
  • * 1 tablespoon ground chipotle
  • * 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • * 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • * 1/4 teaspoon cayenne
Not all of this goes into one batch... you mix a spoon or two in and then continue to do so as you cook, seasoning to taste.
OK... you have ALL the ingredients in one post, with instructions. Go forth and have chile for the holidays.

Couple of notes on the mix above:
Had to add another can of diced tomatoes halfway thru, was becoming too "semi-solid"
Having tasted it now... if you use the directions above, don't accidentally get it on any painted surfaces.
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:09 AM
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Quick Summer Soup
- 0,5 litre of Kefir;
- bunch of Sprouting Onion;
- bunch of Parsley;

1. Cut Sprouting Onion with Parsley thin and add Kefir.
2. Mix 1-2 minute with the spoon.
3. Add salt to taste.
4. Poure the blend into the plates.
 
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Old 01-08-2010, 04:23 AM
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my versions

Lechon Sinigang (i dunno what do we call it in english) no picture

ingredients:

lechon
pepper
onions
tamarind soup
water
salt

procedure :
put everything in a caserole, and let it boil in low fire in 1hr. or until you can see that the juice came from the lechon came out and mix to the soup.
this is one of the best appetizer during drinking session.

the other way of cooking this lechon sinigang

1. saute the onions
2. put the lechon and the water
3. tamarid soup, the sour taste depends on your taste, a little tamarind is enough
4. boil in low fire in 1hr
5. after 1hr it's ready to serve.
===> it's better to put the bone came from the lechon when you boil it.



my version of tuna sisig(super spicy version) no picture

1 can of San Marino Corned Tuna Chili
1 egg
1 medium size onion finely chopped
mayonnaise
cooking oil
salt, pepper, more 3 -5 pcs. chopped chilies(optional)!!

procedure:
1. pre-heat the cooking oil in a pan
2. saute the onion and the chopped chilies
3. put the San Marino Corned Tuna Chili
4. mix it with the onions and the chilies, and crack an egg, you can put some salt and pepper depend on your taste buds
5. mix it with mayonnaise
there you have your super spicy tuna sisig, the best with beer or with brandy and even with rice.

Last edited by Kembelar; 01-08-2010 at 04:35 AM.
 
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:36 AM
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F.A.T.s, or Flat-Assed Tacos


Okay, by popular demand, here is my famous F.A.T. recipe, better known to culinary elitists the world over, as (feel free to drool)…

(Drum roll) Flat-Assed Tacos!

Probably not the best name for a really great meal, especially if you’re inviting the Queen, but if you just want to eat like a King, read on!

First, you need the following:

* 1-1/2 lbs. ground beef
* 8 oz. shredded cheese (I recommend Monterey Jack, or Colby)
* 1/2 head of lettuce, shredded medium
* 1 large can refried beans
* Package of 10″-12″ flour tortillas
* 1/2 onion (red is best), chopped medium
* 2-3 tomatoes, chopped medium
* Hot sauce of choice (I make my own, but in a pinch, Pace “Hot” is great, too)

Brown the ground beef, with salt/pepper to taste. I just use a little soy sauce and pepper. When done, drain it. Heat the refried beans, in a double boiler if you have one, as they tend to stick. While you’re doing that, you can shred the cheese, and chop the lettuce, tomatoes and onions. When everything is ready, put about 1/4″ of vegetable oil in a fry pan (one larger than the tortillas), and bring it up to temperature. When you can sling in a drop of water, and it immediately begins to sizzle, it’s ready. Get your tongs ready, and drop a tortilla into the oil. It will begin to puff up, so you need to keep pushing it back down, so you don’t end up with a flour balloon. It's a lot easier if you poke a couple of holes in it when it starts to puff up, so the hot gas can escape. When it starts to brown slightly on the bottom, turn it over, and lightly brown the other side. Then, put the crisp tortillas on a couple of paper towels on a plate, to get rid of the excess oil. Do up at least one tortilla for every family member before you start serving. The tortillas will cool fairly quickly, but you’re putting hot beans and meat on them, so it really doesn’t matter.

Serving: Spread a thin coat of refried beans around on the tortilla, and then top that with ground beef. Immediately put the shredded cheese on top, so the heat of the meat will melt it. Then add onions, lettuce, and tomato, followed by hot sauce. Some folks like to add a couple of dollops of sour cream, as well. You need to eat this with a fork, ’cause you don’t fold it (or an entrenching tool, if you have one around the kitchen!). I will usually eat two, but then, I’m a pig! One is enough for most folks!

When you’re done, it should look something like this:



Enjoy!
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Last edited by DocSheldon; 01-30-2010 at 04:26 PM.
 
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-09-2010, 07:23 AM
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Great soup recipres would be desired
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-09-2010, 09:28 AM
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Here's one I tried a few weeks ago, that I found on the web. It almost scared me off, 'cause it sounded pretty complex, but it isn't as difficult as it seems.

New Orleans Style Gumbo

Remember that you MUST go through the stock making process for this dish; plain water or a canned stock will simply not do.
The stock can be made in advance and refrigerated or frozen.
Also, if you want a more elegant-looking gumbo (rather than this version, which is rather rustic), remove the chicken from the bones, cut into chunks and add the meat back to the gumbo; also, instead of using whole crabs that you have to crack, omit them and add a pound and a half of good white crabmeat along with the shrimp near the end of cooking. DO NOT under ANY CIRCUMSTANCES use the artificial crab substitute known as “krab” or “surimi”.

FOR THE STOCK:
8 quarts cold water 8-10 pounds chicken parts (backs, necks, etc.) and bones, or a whole chicken, cut up and skillet-browned Shrimp shells and heads, reserved from the 4 pounds of shrimp that have been peeled for the final step of the gumbo (the heads are very important!) 8 ounces onions, chopped 4 ounces celery with tops, chopped 4 ounces carrots, chopped 2 heads garlic, cut in half horizontally Sachet d’épices: In a small cheesecloth bag or tea ball, place:

* 1 teaspoon or so black peppercorns, cracked
* A few parsley stems
* 1 bayleaf
* 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
* 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon leaves
* 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
* 1/2 teaspoon dried basil leaves

(If at all possible, please try to get shrimp with the heads on. Shrimp heads impart a wonderful flavor to the stock, and it just ain’t the same as a real New Orleans gumbo without them. Do whatever you have to do. In many cities you’ll have better luck at Asian seafood markets.)

Remove the skin from the chicken and chop into 3-4 inch pieces, making sure to cut through and expose the bones. Brown the chicken parts and bones in a skilliet with oil, or in a 350°F oven for about 20 minutes.
Put the chicken in the stockpot with the water and bring slowly to a simmer. Periodically skim off any scum that forms, and if you wish use a skimmer to skim off the fat. (This stock simmering process makes your house smell REALLY good!) Let this simmer for at least three, and preferably four hours. It is this long simmering process that extracts the maximum flavor from the chicken meat and bones, as well as the natural gelatin from the bones. When refrigerated, a good chicken stock will be clear and gelatinous (and in fact will set like Jello when refrigerated, if you’ve done it properly).
Add the onion, garlic, carrots and celery. Place the peppercorns, parsley sprigs and dried herbs into a 4-inch square piece of cheesecloth or large tea ball (making what’s called a sachet d’epices) and tie it into a little sack; add the sack to the stock (you can tie the sack closed with some twine and tie the long end of the twine to the handle of the pot; this makes the bag easier to retrieve.) Simmer for one more hour, then add the shrimp shells and heads. Simmer an additional 30 minutes.

Remember that during the simmering process, it’s best not to stir the stock. The end result will be much clearer if it is not agitated while simmering.

Strain thoroughly; the best way to do this is to ladle the stock out and pour it through a strainer which has been lined with a couple of layers of damp cheesecloth. If you’re using the stock immediately, skim off as much fat as you can with a fat skimmer or a piece of paper towel, otherwise cool the stock right away by placing the container into an ice-water-filled sink, stirring to bring the hot liquid from the center to the sides of the container. (Don’t just put hot stock in the refrigerator; it won’t cool enough to prevent possible multiplication of harmful bacteria.) A neat trick I learned recently — fill Ziploc freezer bags with water and freeze them, then place the bags of ice into the stock; this will cool the stock without diluting it! To defat the stock easily, refrigerate so that the fat solidifies on the surface, then skim off.
Makes about 5 quarts of stock.
(Except for the shrimp shells, this is an excellent general-purpose chicken stock. The shells and heads are added at the last minute for the additional seafood flavor for that I like especially for this dish; for general use, though, it’s best to make separate chicken or fish stocks. The stock will keep for a few days in the refrigerator or 6 months in the freezer.)
ROUX:

* 1-1/4 cups flour
* 1 cup oil

Blend thoroughly in a thick skillet and cook over medium-high to high heat, stirring CONSTANTLY. BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO BURN IT!! If you see black specks in the roux, you’ve screwed it up. Dump it out and start over. Keep cooking and stirring until the roux gets darker and darker. It’s best to use a very heavy pot or skillet for roux-making, especially cast iron. With a good cast iron Dutch oven or skillet, you can get a beautiful dark roux in only about 20 minutes. Cook it until it’s a dark, reddish-brown, almost but not quite as dark as milk chocolate. The roux, when finished, almost smells like roasted coffee.
You should turn the fire down or off as the roux nears the right color, because the heat from the pan will continue cooking it. You can also add your onions, bell peppers and celery to the roux as it’s near the end of cooking to arrest the cooking process and to soften the vegetables (this is the way I like to do it). KEEP STIRRING until the roux is relatively cool. Add the roux to the stock.
They don’t call roux “Cajun napalm” for nothing. Don’t let any splatter on you, or you’ll get a nasty burn. Stir carefully.
If you don’t have a heavy enough pan, or if you’re nervous about cooking roux at high heat, remember that a dark Cajun-style roux will take about an hour of constant stirring at low heat, so if you’re pressed for time, a nice blond Creole-style roux will still do nicely, and will take about half the time. Also remember that the roux can be prepared in advance, and refrigerated or frozen. With a little practice, you’ll get good at it.
FOR THE REST:
Sprinkle the chicken pieces with Creole seasoning and brown in the oven. Slice the sausage and brown, pouring off all the fat (especially if you’re using fresh Creole hot sausage).
Sauté the onions, green onions, bell pepper and celery if you haven’t already added them to the roux, and add to the stock. Add the chicken and sausage(s). Add the bay leaves and Creole seasoning (or ground peppers) to taste and stir. Bring to a boil and immediately reduce to a simmer; let simmer for about 45 minutes. Keep tasting and adjusting seasonings as needed.
Add the okra and cook another 30 minutes or so. Make sure that the “ropiness” or “stringiness” from the okra is gone, add the parsley, crab halves and claws (if you’re using them). Cook for another 15 minutes, then add the shrimp (and if you’ve omitted the hard-shell crabs, add the lump crabmeat now). Give it another 6-8 minutes or so, until the shrimp are just done, turning pink. Be very careful not to overcook the shrimp; adding the shrimp should be the very last step.
If there is any fat on the surface of the gumbo, try to skim off as much of it as possible.
Serve generous amounts in bowls over about 1/2 cup of hot rice — claws, shells, bones and all (if you’ve made the original “rustic” version). Remember that the rice goes in the bowl first, and it is not an optional step, despite the trend among some New Orleans restaurants to serve a riceless gumbo.
You may, if you like, sprinkle a small amount of gumbo filé in your individual serving for a little more flavor; just remember that if you’re making a filé gumbo, it should be added to the pot off the fire for its proper thickening action.

To make gumbo properly, is an all day job, but it’s well worth the effort!

Note: I burned the roux, and had to throw it out and start over! When it says STIR CONSTANTLY, it isn't kidding! Don't stop for even a SECOND!
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 01-09-2010, 09:46 AM
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Here's another favorite of mine. It only holds for four or five days in the frig, but around our place, it's usually gone a lot faster than that!

Cricket, you may already have this one. If you don't, give it a try.

Texas Caviar

This is a great cold side-dish. Be prepared for a lot of folks to beg you for the recipe!

Here’s what you’ll need:

* 2 (15.8 ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained
* 1 (14.5 ounce) can petite diced tomatoes, drained
* 2 fresh medium jalapenos, stemmed, seeded and minced
* 1 small onion, cut into small dice
* 1/2 yellow bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and cut into small dice
* 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
* 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar
* 6 tablespoons olive oil (not extra virgin)
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
* 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
* 1 teaspoon dried oregano
* 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin

Mix all ingredients in a medium bowl; cover and refrigerate for 1 to 3 days. Before serving, adjust seasonings to taste, adding extra vinegar, salt and pepper. Transfer to a serving bowl.

Good with tortilla chips, or on chunks of french bread, too.
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Old 01-09-2010, 09:48 AM
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Those all look good Doc. My wife does that last one (she calls it "cowboy caviar"). Wonderful stuff.
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Old 01-09-2010, 10:02 AM
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My original Texas Caviar recipe was given to me by a gal down in Dripping Springs, TX. She claimed it was her recipe, and I'd never heard of it before, so I believed her. The one I posted is the result of experimenting (some of which doesn't always turn out so well) and adding an idea here and there from other recipes I've found. There's a bunch of Texas Caviar recipes on the web now, so I have to wonder whether that gal was blowing smoke up my skirt.

The Gumbo recipe is one that I don't recommend more than once every couple of years, unless you REALLY enjoy doing dishes in a smelly kitchen. It's tasty enough to make it worthwhile, but if someone would market a store-bought roux, I'd sure give it a whirl!
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Old 01-09-2010, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoner3221 View Post
One of my favorite easy to make meals.

Pork Chops with Blue Cheese Gravy

Ingredients

2 tablespoons butter
4 thick center cut pork chops
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 cup whipping cream
3 ounces crumbled blue cheese

Directions

1. Melt 2 tbsp butter in a 12" cast iron skillet, over medium heat. Season the pork chops with fresh ground black pepper and minced garlic. Fry the chops in butter until no longer pink and the juices run clear, about 20 to 25 minutes. Turn occasionally to brown evenly.

2. Remove chops to a plate and keep warm. Stir the whipping cream into the skillet, loosening any bits of meat stuck to the bottom with a wooden spoon. Stir in blue cheese. Cook, stirring constantly until sauce thickens, about 8 minutes. Pour sauce over warm pork chops.
Dang, Stoner...that sounds GOOD! Do you mind if I snag that for the recipes page on my blog?
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Last edited by DocSheldon; 01-09-2010 at 10:52 AM.
 
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:13 AM
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Hey Doc,

Question about your famous F.A.T. recipe. Are you frying the flour tortilla to a crisp state or just browning? In the pic it looks crisp like a pizza shell.

I have consumed many a fried one with brown sugar and cinnamon but don't think I have ever tried meat and beans on one.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:19 AM
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My goodness, do y'all have stocks in Maalox, Pepto and Tums?
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScriptMan View Post
Hey Doc,

Question about your famous F.A.T. recipe. Are you frying the flour tortilla to a crisp state or just browning? In the pic it looks crisp like a pizza shell.

I have consumed many a fried one with brown sugar and cinnamon but don't think I have ever tried meat and beans on one.
That recipe reminds me of Indian Tacos (made on fry bread) which I absolutely love, so I am going to have to try this one.
 
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 01-09-2010, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScriptMan View Post
Hey Doc,

Question about your famous F.A.T. recipe. Are you frying the flour tortilla to a crisp state or just browning? In the pic it looks crisp like a pizza shell.

I have consumed many a fried one with brown sugar and cinnamon but don't think I have ever tried meat and beans on one.
You fry them to a crisp, but without a LOT of browning. They will be stiff by the time you take them out.

What you have probably eaten with brown sugar and cinnamon is called a buńuelo (boon-yoo ay lo). They're made with flour too, but a little different mix. Some folks use regular flour tortillas to make sopapillas (so pah pee yas), but just letting them puff up a lot, but in deep oil. Then they sprinkle the sugar/cinnamon on them before they cool. GREAT with honey!
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