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-   -   Structure of Link Exchange and Article Pages (http://www.v7n.com/forums/showthread.php?t=195637)

Muddy 06-23-2010 12:26 PM

Structure of Link Exchange and Article Pages
 
This was mentioned in another thread:

Quote:

You can also build your own special page for Link Exchange purposes..
Is this generally how it's done? Is it just a page full of links? Is there normally a link to this page on the home page? Are there alternative methods of linking to other websites? I know one way is to include the link in an article, however there may be times where I'm happy to link to them but wouldn't want to give them quite that kind of endorsement.

Ancillary to this, what is the normal structure for placing articles on one's website? In other words, is it much like the above mentioned link page...a page full of links to each article with the article located on its own page? When it comes to articles, which is better, an article on another site with a link to your site, or an article on your own site that will cause your site to rank higher for that subject? I know the ultimate answer is "both" but if one had to choose...

mecatronx 06-23-2010 11:17 PM

1. Link exchange is a technique dead for like 2 years.
2. I'd create 2 articles - 1 on your website, and another for article submitting. What you need from other sites are back links, do-follow, with proper anchors, related niche :)

highseo 06-24-2010 01:41 AM

Link exchange is not dead. However it can not help you, but it works a little for you.
for article writing, i suggest you to write an article for your blog/website then submit it to social bookmarks and any other place that you can, to help this article to gain good ranking on search engines.

Muddy 06-24-2010 07:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mecatronx (Post 1422950)
1. Link exchange is a technique dead for like 2 years.
2. I'd create 2 articles - 1 on your website, and another for article submitting. What you need from other sites are back links, do-follow, with proper anchors, related niche :)

Thanks for the input.

So when you say "submitting" you mean to websites in the practice of publishing articles, right? ehow.com, etc.? You mention creating 2 articles...you mean a duplicate copy of the article should be posted on your own site? Or do you mean 2 distinctly different articles about the same subject?

When you refer to back links from other sites, do you mean links within the article(s) I've written or do you mean links created randomly by folks who found value in my site? In other words, you're eliminating link exchanges entirely if I'm understanding you correctly...

Muddy 06-24-2010 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by highseo (Post 1423069)
Link exchange is not dead. However it can not help you, but it works a little for you.
for article writing, i suggest you to write an article for your blog/website then submit it to social bookmarks and any other place that you can, to help this article to gain good ranking on search engines.

Thanks for the reply.

So there's no problem in writing an article and then submitting it to multiple places? It's okay if more than one place publishes it?

mecatronx 06-24-2010 08:09 AM

I mean 2 different articles. Most article submission sites will only allow for a link in your signature, but in some cases you can get control of the text, with html code, so you can create links within the sites, with proper anchors, surrounded by related context. Try to limit the exposure of those articles to 5-6 article directories, as in most cases other sites will get content from those directories. If that content is on too many sites, the links within it will be more and more useless, as we're talking about duplicate content. That's why I said 2 different articles, so that in case things go wrong, they won't affect your site directly :)
Link exchanges don't work, furthermore, they are getting penalties from Google if they are too many. To add insult to injury, you can't control them efficiently :). Get quality IBLs, try not to have too many OBLs. If you really want to use link exchanges, use 3, or even better 4 way link exchanges.

Muddy 06-24-2010 08:31 AM

Excellent points, thanks! I'm not at all interested in wasting time on link exchanges if they no longer work. Thanks for that heads up too.

So the ideal approach is to write an article (put links in if you can), submit it to 5-6 directories, then write a separate article on the same subject for your website. Repeat process for each subsequent subject/product.

The challenge for me is writing articles, let alone writing TWO for each subject! LOL! How dissimilar must they be?

How deep should your website articles be? Linked straight from the home page, or can there be a "table of contents" page in between?

mecatronx 06-24-2010 08:43 AM

They don't HAVE to be on the same subject :) You can just stick with your niche and general context for the offsite articles. Just make sure your links are not all site wide, that you can link to inner pages concerning similar subjects. Also, you can always try a link wheel.
Hey, SEO is not an easy job to do well :)

Muddy 06-24-2010 08:57 AM

Yes, you're right. Anything worth having takes work.

*Googles link wheel*

HTMLBasicTutor 06-24-2010 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1422609)
This was mentioned in another thread:
Quote:

You can also build your own special page for Link Exchange purposes..
Is this generally how it's done? Is it just a page full of links?

You can create a page of resources, partners or with some such name for links exchanges and the one way out links you wish to provide to your readers. Breaking them down into "themes" would be beneficial over just mixing them up. You can see an example of what I am talking about here: Web Design Computer Basics.

It should not just be a page of links as that would look like a link farm page. What would be better is to require/include your own description/blurb to go with the link.

In the Google Webmaster Guidelines it does suggest to keep the total links on a page to under 100 so how many of these you can do per page would depend on how many other links on the page you have.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1422609)
Is there normally a link to this page on the home page?

My pages on the site above are listed on my site map page, which is linked to on each page. Some people do have a separate link on each page to their links page.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1422609)
Are there alternative methods of linking to other websites? I know one way is to include the link in an article, however there may be times where I'm happy to link to them but wouldn't want to give them quite that kind of endorsement.

  1. Related Resources/Articles section at the bottom of the article. I put a Further Reading section at the end of my blog posts. e.g. Custom Error Pages has a number of links. I could/should improve on this by putting a bit of a blurb with the link.
  2. A sites we visit section somewhere on the page. On one of my blogs I have Sites to Visit and under it links divided into sections below that down the left.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1422609)
Ancillary to this, what is the normal structure for placing articles on one's website? In other words, is it much like the above mentioned link page...a page full of links to each article with the article located on its own page?

You can do this 3 ways:
  1. A summary page listing like themed articles with links to individual pages containing the actual article.
  2. Install a blog on the site and link to it from your global navigation.
  3. Build a blog on a separate domain name and reference it from your original site.
To determine if an onsite blog or external blog is better in your situation, read Domain vs. Subdomain
Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1422609)
When it comes to articles, which is better, an article on another site with a link to your site, or an article on your own site that will cause your site to rank higher for that subject? I know the ultimate answer is "both" but if one had to choose...

If I had to choose, articles on my own site to build authority for the site itself first. I know I suggested an external blog above but what I did was started with HTML Basic Tutor and as additional related information was required for the classes I teach I created the external blogs. Once in a while when writing an article I will reference an existing article on one of my other sites instead of repeating myself (dup content!).

I use to write dubbed down articles for a newsletter and link to the complete article on my blog. That worked out well as the newsletter was archived on their website. :) Maybe an idea for your own newsletter? But make the versions different.

Muddy 06-24-2010 08:22 PM

Great info Hype! Thanks a ton!

Quick question...I couldn't find the link to your link exchange page on your site map...I found Web Design Resources but all those links direct back to your site. Am I missing something?

Thanks again for all the super info!

HTMLBasicTutor 06-24-2010 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Muddy (Post 1423690)
Great info Hype! Thanks a ton!

Quick question...I couldn't find the link to your link exchange page on your site map...I found Web Design Resources but all those links direct back to your site. Am I missing something?

Thanks again for all the super info!

I don't have a link exchange page. Just resources and article pages. ;) Just do your link exchange similar to my examples.

Muddy 06-24-2010 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HTMLBasicTutor (Post 1423699)
I don't have a link exchange page. Just resources and article pages. ;) Just do your link exchange similar to my examples.

Ahh, marvelous! Thanks again!

guy 06-25-2010 05:41 PM

While there are parts of comments above I agree and disagree with, I'm not going to quote and correct or give a thumbs up to, just give my opinion, bare in mind, this is 2010, and worrying about dup content on your own site, specially when it's a blurb or two, is something you shouldn’t even concern yourself with, let alone consider an issue. (again, this is just my opinion, and hey, others are entitled to their own, too, but again, Search Engines have come a long way since 1998 if you know what i mean :D)

As for the Link Exchange page, don't use one, ever. Calling it resources, sites I love, besties, friends for life or even 'the coolest related sites on earth that will benefit my readers' doesn't change the fact that it's a Link Exchange page (unless you nofollow all the links on that page, but i'm guessing that defeats the purpose of a link exchange page, specially if said site owners find out (not that they have to find out if you do it in a sneaky way)), but yeah, no use.

See, if you're going to build a 'link exchange' page, in hopes of landing some backlinks, then what you're doing is, in essence, not much at all. The valuable backlinks are those one way links.

If you mean, how to let people know of sites you visit, enjoy, etc, do just that then (assuming they don't have a link back to your site) in your sidebar or something, under the appropriate title. With blogs, that's what blogrolls are for, and with those you can nofollow the links as you're simply sharing them with readers, not Search Engines ;)

If your site isn't running off some sort of CMS, and isn't in a blog structure, then having an archive page will fix that, it doesn't have to be a sitemap, though including your article links in there is a must for sure. With a searchable archive, and the article titles listed in there, and linked, you're providing more value to your readers anyway, and i'm pretty sure ElGoog and the likes will appreciate it too.


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