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  #21  
Old 04-27-2013, 04:39 PM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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Originally Posted by kju385 View Post
EU elections are held regularly. I.e. Nigel Farrage was chosen democratically to represent UK in EU parliament. And I don't really see how European commission has anything to do with statistical data.
You are making an amalgam between European Parliament and the European commission The European Commission do not have elected representants, except the president which is elected by the European Parliament.

Here is what you mentionned: "Eurostat wealth data"

Eurostat wealth data come from the European commission

Quote:
Over the years its task has broadened and when the European Community was founded in 1958 it became a Directorate-General (DG) of the European Commission.
http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/por.../eurostat/home


Quote:
Here is the other side...


The official report came out last week. In short, wealth isn't evenly distributed in any country (what a shock!). But the political bomb is that in average Italians, Spanish and especially Cyprus people are among the wealthiest in Europe. Average German household owns 195,000 Euro in assets. Spanish have around 300,000 Euro and Cypriot 671,000 Euro. Now keep in mind there is a great debt to be paid, and naturally, no one is eager to pick up the tab. All I said was, it's understandable why they are protesting. Nothing more, nothing less.
What is the source of that?


Quote:
I'm not denying it. But taking one item out of context and imputing it to someone else isn't only rude, it's also against the rules.
Well, many Europeans are still afraid of a grand strong Germany and the other former ally countries, also when you take into consideration what Chancellor Merkel said recently, it easy to make the connection which we all suffered.

Quote:
I didn't say a thing about you, don't really understand this comment. If you refrain from ad hominem arguments, so will I.
You misinterpreted my comments


Quote:
Well, seems to me your freedom is greatly influenced by certain lobbies which were formed in an undemocratic fashion. According to your own articles and topics.
You are throwing this in this thread, right?

‘Monsanto Protection Act’: Chemical monopoly writes its own law
The Corruption of Capitalism in America
CORPORATE FASCISM: The Destruction of America's Middle Class
Senate oks Budget: Marathon Vote Calls On a $1T Tax Hike

Are you basing your opinion on a country from this, aren't you?

I love the US and I like the Americans, it doesn't mean that I shouldn't not say something about injustice, potential health problems and social issues.

Raising issues and learning from them, could be very interesting for others. Anyway that's my opinion.


Quote:
From your perspective it will never make sense. Border restrictions (joint market - most of Croatian trade is connected to eurozone area) will enable me to do business far more easily and far less costly then now. I'll be able to compete for strong job positions that aren't available in my country. And the competition will drop the general level of prices. Good enough for me.
The problem is that each time you think of the positive things, it will create more bad stuffs than good and we will pay the bills. Because the politicians don't care about it, they are not accountable for their actions.
 
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  #22  
Old 04-27-2013, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave7 View Post
What is the source of that?
The report itself.

But here, something to ease your mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave7 View Post
Well, many Europeans are still afraid of a grand strong Germany and the other former ally countries, also when you take into consideration what Chancellor Merkel said recently, it easy to make the connection which we all suffered.
This is true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave7 View Post
Are you basing your opinion on a country from this, aren't you?

I love the US and I like the Americans, it doesn't mean that I shouldn't not say something about injustice, potential health problems and social issues.

Raising issues and learning from them, could be very interesting for others. Anyway that's my opinion.
If I was basing my opinions on only the bad things in the media, I wouldn't get the full picture would I? But my answer is no, since I have family in US and have met over a two dozen Americans personally. People tend to be very different from their governments. All of which left a good impression

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave7 View Post
The problem is that each time you think of the positive things, it will create more bad stuffs than good and we will pay the bills. Because the politicians don't care about it, they are not accountable for their actions.
The part about politicians I agree completely with. First part about applies to some extent in eurozone area. For some it will be disaster. For others, opportunity of a lifetime. You see, European national economies are already strongly connected with each other. Borders, custom protocols, everything related only makes life harder here. And costs money from the ordinary people in taxes, jobs, investments, you name it. EU isn't the perfect solution, but it's better in comparison to previous ones.

EU certainly has downsides, let's just say my country raised several practical issues (wine industry, shipbuilding, etc.) even before we enter the joint market. Simply put, practical benefits outweigh the costs for the majority of people. It's all about money...

Last edited by kju385; 04-27-2013 at 06:11 PM.
 
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  #23  
Old 04-27-2013, 06:09 PM
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From the article above, food for thought:

Quote:
The survey could also fuel the sense of injustice among European policy makers when criticized by their American counterparts about their handling of the debt crisis. By coincidence, the study appeared as the U.S. Treasury secretary, Jacob J. Lew, was touring European capitals urging leaders to do more to promote growth.

According to the E.C.B. data, Americans are the ones with too much debt. In the euro area, 44 percent of households have some kind of debt, compared with 75 percent in the United States. In addition, Americans as a group devote a much larger share of their income to paying interest on debt.
 
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  #24  
Old 04-27-2013, 07:02 PM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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That's why I am an Eurosceptic, and this is also happening here in US. The deindustrialization of our countries to the benefits of cheap labor countries. Today you have a skyrocketing unemployment in the developed countries that is creating some serious problems and these good paying jobs are not going to come back.

So, at first the idea look fantastic, but very soon after the euphoria, it looks extremely bad for the people. The politicians can say whatever they want, they are not the one looking desesperatly for decent jobs, because they are progressively gone. The finance industry and the central bankers are the real winners, after comes the big industrial guys making their goods in under developed countries all over the world. Actually the French industries are completly delocalizing their operations in North Africa, Asia, and East Europe for cheap labor.

Here in US, they push people to be educated, well in West Europe they are already well educated, still, they don't have jobs because the markets are saturated and rather decrease.

For example, many French engineers and other high level education go to England, Canada, Australia, US, Japan and even Asia to find something.
It raises some other problems like: Why are the French people paying from their income, tax free education for someone going to be hired in a different country, and in foreign companies?

This important human factor is completly forgotten by the enthusiast globalists, but do they really care about it? That's the question to ask.
 
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  #25  
Old 04-27-2013, 08:03 PM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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Another example here in US: The Earth Rare Minerals

I watched a documentary about how the whole US industry of magnet were bought by Chinese companies with the US politicians helping doing these operations. Thousands of employments destroyed. According to the documentary, there is only one company in US producing magnets made from earth rare minerals and one mine starting to re-open with a new technology for exploiting the earth rare minerals.

So this is a critical national security story. Parts of weaponeries like gyroscopes for missiles are mostly made from magnets made in China. But that's not all, the Chinese raise the price of earth rare minerals basically 9 times per year. That's the dark side of the globalization.

Here is a few interesting articles.

Are We Losing the Race for Rare Earths?

Quote:
The United States, like most of the industrialized world, is currently engaged in a race to develop viable, non-Chinese sources of the rare earth elements that are so critical to modern technologies. And we better move fast, or we will lose that race.

Why are rare earths so important? Everything from smartphones to iPods to missile systems requires rare earths. Almost every piece of high tech gadgetry contains some combination of rare earths to make volumes louder, E-mails vibrate, and bombs able to hit their targets. Nations that control rare earth production own one of the most capable economic and national security levers in the modern world. Over the last quarter century, that lever has been controlled overwhelmingly by China.

[Take the U.S. News Poll: Will the Apple iPad Mini Be Successful?]

China began a dedicated campaign to dominate the rare earth supply chain back in the 1970s. In 1992, Deng Xiaoping's drive to control these elements was famously reflected in his statement that the "Middle East has oil, China has rare earths." China today has the largest share of rare earth deposits on Earth—almost half the world's reserves. As a result, Beijing has been able to effectively use access to rare earths as a way to compel high tech companies to establish production in China. It has also worked to eliminate the competition; starting in the 1990s, China dumped huge quantities of rare earths onto the world market, resulting in plunging prices that forced U.S. companies out of the business.

[Read about America's dependency on Chinese earth metals.]

With U.S. and foreign competitors out of the way, China began to use rare earths as an economic development lever. It works like this: Companies that produce their high tech products in China can get the benefit of lower prices as well as a guaranteed supply. China's intent all along was not just to develop rare earth production, but also the downstream high tech industries that depend on rare earths. This supply chain brings with it thousand of jobs—and tremendous dependency on China. The country currently has a stranglehold on the rare earth supply, amounting to more than 95 percent of worldwide production.

But a backlash is beginning. Many companies are increasingly loathe to move their production to mainland China. Most are afraid of the potential of intellectual property infringement and industrial espionage. But the need to gain a cost effective, guaranteed supply of rare earths means that many have been forced to make a "deal with the devil." If viable, non-Chinese sources are developed soon, however, companies will have an alternative that will allow them a way out of the China relocation trap.
http://www.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/...nce-from-china

Here another one

3 Rare Earth Companies Ramping Up Production

Quote:
China's control of the rare earth market has come under increased scrutiny since 2010. Over the past several years, China has slashed its export quotas of rare earth minerals to cope with their growing domestic demand. U.S. industry officials suggest it is an unfair trade practice, against rules established by the World Trade Organization [WTO], a group that includes China as a member. Currently, China produces about 95 percent of global rare earth supplies. In this article, I will cover three rare earth companies with production outside of China. All three of these companies had major announcements last week.
http://seekingalpha.com/article/8445...-up-production
 
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  #26  
Old 04-28-2013, 09:50 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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The single biggest weapon China is holding to hold the rest of the globe's economy hostage is not its money, population, army, or cheap plastic baubles -- it is the fact that China owns virtually the entire global supply of "rare earth metals" that so many industries depend upon. If China doesn't share its rare earth metals -- and it's sharing less and less -- the Chinese could lterally cripple industry (including the petrochemical and defense industry) everywhere outside its borders.
 
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  #27  
Old 04-28-2013, 09:57 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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The Bureau for International Reporting travels to Canada's Northwest Territories, the California desert and China to report on a looming supply crunch of rare earth metals, key ingredients to green technology and many defense weapons systems.
 
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  #28  
Old 04-29-2013, 10:10 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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Back to the topic

The remarkable rise of continental Euroscepticism

Trust in the EU has plummeted across the continent. Both southern debtors and northern creditors feel like they are victims

Quote:
Once it was seen as a British disease. But Euroscepticism has now spread across the continent like a virus. As the data from Eurobarometer shows, trust in the European project has fallen even faster than growth rates. Since the beginning of the crisis, trust in the EU has fallen from +10 to -22 in France, from +20 to -29 points in Germany, from +30 to -22 points in Italy, from +42 to -52 points in Spain, from +50 to +6 points in Poland and from -13 to -49 points in the UK.


What is striking is that everyone in the EU has lost faith in the project: both creditors and debtors, and eurozone countries, would-be members and "opt-outs". Back in 2007, people thought that the UK, which scored minus 13 points in trust, was the Eurosceptic outlier. Now, remarkably, the four largest eurozone countries have even lower levels of trust in the EU institutions than Britain back in 2007. So what is going on?


The old explanation for Euroscepticism was the alleged existence of a democratic deficit within the EU. Decisions, critics said, were taken by unaccountable institutions rather than elected national governments. But the current crisis is born not of a clash between Brussels and the member states but a clash between the democratic wills of citizens in northern and southern Europe, the so-called centre and periphery. And both sides are now using the EU institutions to advance their interests.


In the past, there was an unwritten rule that EU institutions would police the single market and other technical areas of policy – from common standards for the composition of tomato paste to lawnmower sound emissions – while national governments would continue to have a monopoly on the delivery of services and policymaking in the most sensitive areas on which national elections depended.


Since the crisis began, citizens in creditor countries have become resistant to taking responsibility for the debts of others without having mechanisms for controlling their spending. With the fiscal compact and demands by the ECB for comprehensive domestic reforms, Eurocrats have crossed many of the red lines of national sovereignty, extending their reach way beyond food safety standards to exert control over pensions, taxes, salaries, labour market, and public jobs. These areas go to the heart of the welfare states and national identities.


To an increasing number of citizens in southern European countries, the EU looks like the IMF did in Latin America: a golden straitjacket that is strangling the space for national politics and emptying their national democracies of content. In this new scenario, governments come or go but policies remain basically the same and cannot be challenged. Meanwhile, in northern European countries, the EU is increasingly seen to have failed as a controller for the policies of the southern rim. The creditors have a sense of victimhood that mirrors that of the debtors.


If sovereignty is understood as the capacity of the people to decide what they want for their country, few in either the north or the south today feel that they are sovereign. A substantial part of democracy has vanished at the national level but it has not been recreated at the European level.


In a fully-functioning national political system, political parties would be able to voice these different perspectives – and hopefully act as a referee and find common ground between them. But that is precisely what the European political system cannot deliver: because it lacks true political parties, a proper government and a public sphere, the EU cannot compensate the failures of national democracies. Instead of a battle of ideas, the EU has been marred by a vicious circle between anti-EU populism and technocratic agreements between member states that are afraid of their citizens.


Is the rise of anti-EU populism here to stay? The hope is that as growth picks up, Euroscepticism will weaken and eventually recede. But the collapse of trust in the EU runs deeper than that. Enthusiasm for the EU will not return unless the EU profoundly changes the way it deals with its member states and its citizens.
Read the entire article there at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...cepticism-rise
 
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  #29  
Old 04-30-2013, 11:07 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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EU to set up euro-election 'troll patrol' to tackle Eurosceptic surge

The European Parliament is to spend almost 2 million on press monitoring and trawling Eurosceptic debates on the internet for "trolls" with whom to debate in the run-up and during euro-elections next year amid fears that hostility to the EU is growing.

Quote:
The Daily Telegraph has seen confidential spending proposals and internal documents planning an unprecedented propaganda blitz ahead of and during European elections in June 2014.

Key to a new strategy will be "public opinion monitoring tools" to "identify at an early stage whether debates of political nature among followers in social media and blogs have the potential to attract media and citizens' interest".

Spending on "qualitative media analysis" is to be increased by 1.7 million and while most of the money is to be found in existing budgets an additional 787,000 will be need to be raised next year despite calls for EU spending to reflect national austerity.

"Particular attention needs to be paid to the countries that have experienced a surge in Euroscepticism," said a confidential document agreed last year.

"Parliament's institutional communicators must have the ability to monitor public conversation and sentiment on the ground and in real time, to understand 'trending topics' and have the capacity to react quickly, in a targeted and relevant manner, to join in and influence the conversation, for example, by providing facts and figures to deconstructing myths."

Training for parliament officials begins later this month.

Paul Nuttall, UKIP's deputy leader, has attacked the proposals, which he said, violate the neutrality of the EU civil service by turning officials into a "troll patrol", stalking the internet to make unwanted and provocative political contributions in social media debates.

"Spending over a million pounds for EU public servants to become Twitter trolls in office hours is wasteful and truly ridiculous," he said.

"It strikes me as bizarre that the EU administration is playing such an explicitly political role with a brief to target Eurosceptics - that's code for parties like Ukip, and this is hardly neutral."

A confidential document discussed by officials last week appears to acknowledge problems by admitting that "there are fine lines separating institutional and political communication".

Parliament officials declined to comment on the confidential documents and ongoing private discussions within the EU assembly's administration.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...tic-surge.html

What? A EU Intelligence operations against the Eurosceptics financed by Europeans taxpayers?

Oh man, what a waste! They aren't going to win people wishes, they must be desesperate
 
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  #30  
Old 04-30-2013, 11:45 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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Vive la Democratie! {sarcasm}

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  #31  
Old 05-15-2013, 11:04 AM
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EU policy in a self destruction mode...

Unemployment in Euro Zone Reaches a Record 12%

Quote:
While the euro zone has been transfixed lately by the Cyprus meltdown, another and potentially bigger European crisis has continued to simmer: record-high unemployment.

Spending cuts and tax increases aimed at trimming debt and addressing the financial crises in bailed-out euro zone countries, and the rising rate of joblessness in much of the currency bloc, “are feeding off of each other,” said Mark Cliffe, chief economist at ING Group.

“It’s a bit of a vicious circle,” he said. “Europe is pursuing a policy that is self-evidently failing.”

The euro zone jobless rate rose to 12.0 percent in the first two months of the year, the latest in a series of record highs tracing to late 2011, Eurostat, the statistical agency of the European Union, reported Tuesday.

The agency revised upward the January jobless rate for the euro zone from the previously reported 11.9 percent, itself a record. For the overall European Union, Eurostat said the February jobless rate rose to 10.9 percent from 10.8 percent in January, with more than 26 million people without work across the 27-nation bloc.

Both the jobless rates and the number of unemployed are the highest Eurostat has recorded in data that reach back to 1995, before the creation of the euro.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/03/bu...2-percent.html
 
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  #32  
Old 05-15-2013, 11:13 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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A true hero!

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  #33  
Old 05-22-2013, 08:16 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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President Francois Hollande’s effort to ask the French to tighten their belts was dealt a blow this week after the minister he’d charged with fighting tax evasion admitted to a secret overseas bank account.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-0...k-account.html

There a gang of crocs from right wing to left wing, these people are purposely destroying all Europeen nations for an idealistic project that will never work.


Quote:
Francois Hollande's call for a joint European economic government should be considered
No wonder why this guy is a traitor with 25% of French people approval, I wish the guilotine should be back in service, these guys are doing worse than the French kings, they are not only betraying our people but also our country!


Each time the EU have a new project, they create a new tax income, they are all geniuses. Keep enslaving the people, we will sooner or later raise against this satanic EU project.

Nigel Farage, the best voice of the opposition!

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  #34  
Old 05-22-2013, 08:28 AM
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Do you want to know if France is serious about their debt and defecit?
What are they doing about the 600,000 euros this minister has tucked away?
Are they taxing it? Confiscating it? What?
 
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:03 AM
Franc Tireur Franc Tireur is offline
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Originally Posted by Zap View Post
Do you want to know if France is serious about their debt and defecit?
What are they doing about the 600,000 euros this minister has tucked away?
Are they taxing it? Confiscating it? What?
They caught Cahuzac, Hollande’s budget minister held in an offshore account for years. What they don't say is that rumours about cover up of Hollande offshore account too.

I don't know what they will do at this point, perhaps they will fine and tax this account.
 
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  #36  
Old 05-22-2013, 09:08 AM
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What people should know about the European banking system aka European central bank "ECB" is regarding the European constitution that the ECB is not accountable from any EU governments, not accountable from the European parliament and not accountable from the European commission. They are totally independent with no political supervisions at all. That's what all of these European politicians voted for in our name, that's treasonous!

Why the whole banking system is a scam

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  #37  
Old 05-25-2013, 11:17 AM
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Just a little recapitulation about Europe peace and its "Noble Prize".

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Old 05-31-2013, 03:32 PM
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Eurozone Unemployment Reaches Record High Of 12.2 Percent

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The unemployment rate across the 17 European countries that use the euro hit a record 12.2 percent in April, and the number of unemployed is on track to reach 20 million by year's end.

The worsening jobs crisis points to the recession that has gripped the euro alliance. Many countries are struggling to stimulate growth while grappling with a debt crisis that's led governments to slash spending and raise taxes.

Unemployment in the eurozone rose in April from the previous record of 12.1 percent set in March, Eurostat, the European Union's statistics office, said Friday. In 2008, before the worst of the financial crisis, the rate was far less – around 7.5 percent.

The number of unemployed rose 95,000 to 19.38 million. The currency bloc's population is about 330 million.

Private companies in the eurozone haven't managed to fill the vacuum created by drastically reduced government spending. In the United States, by contrast, governments have imposed far milder spending cuts and tax increases. Unemployment, at 7.5 percent, is far lower. And consumers and private companies have kept spending, steadily if modestly.

The unemployment rate for the overall eurozone masks sharp disparities among individual countries. Unemployment in Greece and Spain top 25 percent. In Germany, the rate is a low 5.4 percent.

The differences are particularly stark for youth unemployment. More than half of people ages 16 to 25 in Greece and Spain are unemployed. In Italy, the rate for this group tops 40 percent. For Germany, it's just 7.5 percent.

"Youth joblessness at these levels risks permanently entrenched unemployment, lowering the rate of sustainable growth in the future," said Tom Rogers, senior economic adviser at Ernst & Young.

The disparities reflect the varying performances of the euro economies. Greece is in its sixth year of a savage recession. Germany's economy has until recently been growing at a healthy pace.

As a whole, the eurozone is stuck in its longest recession since the euro was launched in 1999. The six quarters of economic decline represent a longer recession than the one that followed the 2008 financial crisis, though it's not as deep.

The U.S. economy, the world's largest, has demonstrated far more resilience. It's grown steadily since the end of its recession in June 2009. And the U.S. job market has steadily improved: The unemployment rate has fallen sharply from a peak of 10 percent.

The eurozone marks the epicenter of Europe's debt crisis. But other countries in the region are also struggling to recover. Some, like Britain, are focused on shrinking their deficits even while demand in their main export market – the eurozone – is falling.

As a result, unemployment in the wider 27-nation EU, which includes the non-euro countries such as Britain and Poland, has risen in recent months. In April, the rate remained 11 percent.

A key factor behind Europe's economic decline has been a broad focus on paring debt by raising taxes and slashing spending. As long as many governments continue to cut spending and the confidence of consumers and businesses remains low, economists don't expect any meaningful recovery in coming months.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3364881.html

It is pretty clear that the centralized power into one European government cannot work, because all countries have different kind of economies, social protections and should have different economic policies. With an European commission making one policy for all, it simply wouldn't work.

That's the results of this policy dictated by Brussels capital of the European Union (EU).
 
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Old 06-01-2013, 07:42 AM
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Frankfurt Braces for ‘Blockupy’ Protests

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Undeterred by rain, thousands of “Blockupy” protesters are flooding Frankfurt this weekend to oppose tough austerity measures affecting euro-zone countries.

Activists plan large demonstrations, sit-ins and other acts of civil disobedience aimed at disrupting the proper functioning of institutions that determined plans to rescue troubled banks and debt-ridden countries such as Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland.

In Frankfurt, the main target is the European Central Bank. Protesters are also gathering in Lisbon, where the “Que Se Lixe a Troika” will protest outside the International Monetary Fund’s national headquarters, and in Madrid, where “Mareas Ciudadanas” will demonstrate in front of the national European Commission complex. Altogether, protests are planned in 70 cities in 10 European countries.

Blockupy protesters say those three institutions–known as the troika–imposed austere, belt-tightening measures on Europeans while spending billions to bail out banks at the expense of ordinary people. Demonstrators say their goal is to “defend the democratic and social rights of Europe’s employed, precarious workers and unemployed.”
http://blogs.wsj.com/eurocrisis/2013...kupy-protests/
 
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Old 06-01-2013, 07:49 AM
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German euro founder calls for 'catastrophic' currency to be broken up

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Oskar Lafontaine, the German finance minister who launched the euro, has called for a break-up of the single currency to let southern Europe recover, warning that the current course is "leading to disaster".
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/f...broken-up.html
 
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