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  #1  
Old 02-10-2012, 04:04 PM
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Depart of Labor says kids can't work on farms

Take your blood pressure meds before you read this article.

Here is even more idiocy from the washington crowd.

Quote:
Will My Children Be Allowed to Work on Our Farm?

The Department of Labor has proposed new rules that would restrict children under the age of 16 from working on a farm or ranch. The list of tasks youth would not be allowed to do is astonishing to me. For example, milking cows would not be allowed, and neither would building a fence. One item that stood out to me was that no youth under the age of 16 would be allowed to use a tool that was powered by any source other than hand or foot power
Please take the time to read the full article at:
http://chrischinn.wordpress.com/2012...k-on-our-farm/

Now in family friendly terms, tell me what you think. I know it may be hard to be family friendly but please do.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:16 AM
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I think it's ridiculous. They don't go into the list of what can and can't be done, but if they can't milk a cow, I'm betting they can't even gather the eggs.

I grew up working on my grandparents' farm. And I set chores for my daughter when I started keeping a few animals in Florida. My grandparents were smart enough to keep me safe while I worked with them, and I knew what precautions to take for my daughter. I didn't work her from sunup to sundown, depriving her of an education, or put her in harm's way. I suspect just about all parents who farm would put their child's welfare first in the same way.

Once upon a time, when many families depended on farming for their very subsistence, and schools were routinely closed so children COULD work on the farms because they were needed, this might have been a different matter. But we live in a different world today, and this regulation simply is not needed, IMO.

Not that that fact ever stopped the government. Pretty soon they'll be regulating our bathroom visits.
 
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  #3  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:34 AM
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Working on the family farm is far more healthy than running with a street gang.
 
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  #4  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScriptMan View Post
Working on the family farm is far more healthy than running with a street gang.
Hadn't even thought about street gangs. That would be an understatement, LOL.

Why don't they regulate those?

BTW, I agree with the things the person in the article said. Children develop a lot of self-esteem and work ethic from working, and farming is a great place for this to happen.

I also took my daughter to work with me at the natural health place where I worked. One day we became SWAMPED ... and I had taught her along the way all the aspects of my job. I was there working alone one day, and she was with me ... she ran the cash register ALL DAY, with zero help from me, and it came out to the penny (I was really afraid I'd end up docked LOL, but she did it perfectly!). She helped customers find things, referred the right ones to me for consultation, drew TONS of compliments from everyone, and I was SO proud of her. She was 11 or 12 at the time. It was an invaluable experience for her, in my opinion.

Of course, her father claimed it was child abuse (divorce going on). It was no more physically demanding (less so) than if she'd been playing. She might not have gotten any book-work done that day, but she was all caught up in school, and learned more than the books could have taught.

At the end of the day, she was pleased and proud of herself. I appreciated what the work had taught her.

After a couple of weeks listening to her dad's comments about me "forcing her to work" she thought I'd abused her and she lost all the benefit from the experience. She was now a victim instead of someone who could be proud of what she'd accomplished.

Great job, Dad.

In the same vein, Great job, Uncle Sam.

(And incidentally, I didn't "force" her. We were busy, I was working alone. It's happened before. If she didn't help ... I'd just have been busy and everyone would have had to wait longer. No biggie. She stepped in on her own, and took responsibility. I was PROUD of her for taking the initiative. Sigh ... )
 
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  #5  
Old 02-11-2012, 12:31 PM
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Everyone is for the Family farm - the video preceding the blog is not a family farm but an industrial operation involving "farm animals"... wolf in sheep disguise and nothing more, using the "family" the same as their cement bound livestock.

ScriptMan - is there a law you intend to pass to prevent the the grazing of livestock - as what is being promoted is no less than institutionalized unethical treatment of farm animals "made" for profit.
 
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  #6  
Old 02-11-2012, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScriptMan View Post
no youth under the age of 16 would be allowed to use a tool that was powered by any source other than hand or foot power
Does this include foot powered milking tools?

The fact is, this will not stop farmers from having their children do farm "chores". The Dept. of Labor cannot regulate these "activities" that will nor occur more "under wraps".
 
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  #7  
Old 02-11-2012, 01:28 PM
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Breezewood, this thread is about DC imposing regulations about children working on family farms. If youd like to start a PETA inspired thread about farm animals, feel free to do so, but trolling this thread with unrelated BS isnt going to be allowed.

Saying it here instead of an infraction, but i dont mind going to the next level if you persist.

Last edited by robjones; 02-11-2012 at 01:32 PM.
 
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  #8  
Old 02-11-2012, 01:37 PM
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Breezy, what are you smoking today? I don't have a clue what you are talking about.

Every farm I ever saw had farm animals destined for slaughter. I realize that if the DNC said it was true you would argue that meat grows in the back room of the supermarket but that just isn't true.

They live on a farm until they are slaughtered. Farmers take better care of the stock than potheads do of their pets.

If you want to cry about makin' bacon, shed your tears somewhere else. I don't give a damn.
 
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  #9  
Old 02-11-2012, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScriptMan View Post
If you want to cry about makin' bacon, shed your tears somewhere else. I don't give a damn.
Now I really want bacon instead of the chicken in front of me.
 
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  #10  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:03 PM
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Pfft, tell me about it. I'm getting up at midnight and 4am to check my goats right now, so no one goes into labor needing help and me not being there. Even when it's 20-something degrees out there and a sharp wind is blowing.

I don't make THEM go out in weather like that.

Now, the doe kids will probably be retained or sold as milkers, but the buck kids are going to be named "Bar-B-que" unless someone wants to pay me a good bit of money to keep them as pets or (unlikely) bucks. But I still take good care of them.

And if I had children here ... I'd be sending them out to collect eggs, and teaching them to milk goats and pick berries. It's good for them, IMO, and no, I don't really expect the govt. to regulate that. I just wonder why they even think it could be necessary to pass such laws.

I wouldn't have children putting bullets through wild hogs or using the fence stretcher.
 
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  #11  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by searchbliss View Post
Now I really want bacon instead of the chicken in front of me.
You guys would just have to mention bacon, wouldn't you? I came across the news of the bacon milkshake from Jack in the Box:

Quote:
Bacon milkshake? Yes, from Jack in the Box.
Updated: Feb 11, 2012 8:00 AM PST

By Schuyler Velasco

If conventional wisdom says that bacon makes everything better, then Jack in the Box may finally have discovered the exception: the bacon milkshake.

"It's for real. Bacon Shake," reads an ad from the San Diego-based fast food burger chain. "Ask for it today."

The public reaction so far has been largely negative, but taste isn't really the point. The bacon shake is the latest in a long line of fast food fare so outrageous that they serve mainly to draw attention to the fast food chain as a whole, rather than as a serious menu item. Take KFC's "Double Down" sandwich from 2010 (the one with fried chicken breasts as the "bread"), or the perennial resurgence of the McDonald's McRib.
Excerpt. More at: http://www.wect.com/story/16897622/b...ack-in-the-box
 
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  #12  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:43 PM
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Wasn't that sandwich with the chicken for the bread supposed to be "healthy" due to it's lack of bread (ie carbs?). Pfftttt.

I saw some kind of stick-looking thing (didn't bother reading what was on the stick) dipped in chocolate and then rolled in bacon pieces on Pinterest. Seems it's somewhat popular.

I like bacon but ... that's all just too weird for me. Bacon shakes, bacon chocolate ...
 
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  #13  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:50 PM
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Back on topic. After I left here I found this Usenet post from RonB regarding this topic that I thought I should share.

Quote:
When I was in high school I played football and participated in
track. Those were the good days when I was lean, mean, muscled and
tan, but I didn't get that way on the football field. I did it
bouncing around on hay trailers or lifting 100 pound piglets so the
vet could vaccinate them. We stretched fence, did carpentry and
maintenance work but generally kept ourselves in football condition by
doing hard work. With laws like this Michell Obama will have to step
up her work to 'help" fat kids.

In later years I ended up in aerospace program management and business
development -- a business that demands long, long hours. I can't tell
how many times I have sat at my desk at 11:00 pm getting work done for
the next day's deadline when my mind went back to the hot, dusty
confines near the roof of a barn as I was pulling bales off of a
conveyer and blowing dust out of my nose. Those were the good old
days when I developed a pretty fair work ethic.

RonB
I am pretty sure he said things learned as a youngster greatly helped him out in later life. But I will let you decide what he said.
 
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  #14  
Old 02-11-2012, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Will My Children Be Allowed to Work on Our Farm?

The Department of Labor has proposed new rules that would restrict children under the age of 16 from working on a farm or ranch. The list of tasks youth would not be allowed to do is astonishing to me. For example, milking cows would not be allowed, and neither would building a fence. One item that stood out to me was that no youth under the age of 16 would be allowed to use a tool that was powered by any source other than hand or foot power. That would eliminate youth using flashlights, garden hoses (because hoses are powered by water) battery operated screwdrivers, etc. When hearing this, my son asked me if that meant he no longer had to brush his teeth since his toothbrush was battery operated.

The Department of Labor has proposed new rules that would restrict children under the age of 16 from working on a farm or ranch.



The article presents no factual support for any of its claims.
 
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  #15  
Old 02-11-2012, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze Wood View Post

The Department of Labor has proposed new rules that would restrict children under the age of 16 from working on a farm or ranch.



The article presents no factual support for any of its claims.
Try this:
Quote:
Department of Labor says it will re-propose Farm Kid Regulation
February 3, 2012 By Shawna (Robertson) Aakre Leave a Comment

The House of Representatives Small Business Committee’s Agriculture Subcommittee held a hearing yesterday on the effects of proposed child labor regulations on small-business producers. The hearing comes a day after the Department of Labor announced it would re-propose the “parental exemption” portion of the regulation related to minors working on the farm, seeking additional comments and modifications to “ensure protection of both children and rural values.”

Members in the subcommittee hearing heard testimony from Department of Labor and USDA officials. The announcement from the Department of Labor, also discussed during the hearing, will again allow children of any age to work on a farm as long as it is owned by a parent or someone acting as a parent. The regulation last fall required any farm worker to be at least 16. Witnesses representing the FFA and family farmers explained how these regulations would hinder their operation and their children’s experiences both on and off the farm if they were not changed.

The DOL said the re-proposed portion of the rule will be available for comment in the summer. The parental exemption allows children of any age who are employed by their parent, or a person standing in the place of a parent, to perform any job on a farm owned by the parent or the person in place of the parent.

The Department said its decision came partly because of feedback from the public and Members of Congress following the publication of a proposed rule on child labor, issued in September.
Excerpt. Full article at: http://americanagnetwork.com/2012/02...id-regulation/

The rules, as originally proposed, would have eliminated the "parental exemption" which has allowed kids to work on their family's farms.
 
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Old 02-11-2012, 10:35 PM
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Well breeze, the article includes video of the person speaking at the hearings, so the writer is what historians call a "primary source".

But as you've decided to re-commence feces throwing without checking Google... Heres a letter from the Tennessee Farm Bureau that corraborates the items you highlighted as potentially dubious.

TFBF Speaks Out about Child Labor Law Proposal - http://www.tnfarmbureau.org/content/...r-law-proposal

Having located it for you we'll assume you can read that for yourself without someone having to quote the applicable passages. It took me less time to find this info than it took to answer you. Next time please do the exercise on your own like a real grownup.

Last edited by robjones; 02-11-2012 at 11:09 PM.
 
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  #17  
Old 02-11-2012, 11:03 PM
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This is a ridiculous law if passed. Working in a family farm is like teaching children how to be responsible adults when they grow up. When they learn how to accomplish certain farm chores, they start to learn being responsible on some tasks that are given to them. I also lived in a farm when I was small. I learned how to harvest some vegetables which were given as a task to me. I make sure that I'll be able to gather the certain amount of veggies needed to complete my task. It helped me became responsible at a young age.
 
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  #18  
Old 02-12-2012, 05:32 AM
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The new proposed regulation is a step in the right direction but this part could still use some rewording.

Quote:
The DOL said the re-proposed portion of the rule will be available for comment in the summer. The parental exemption allows children of any age who are employed by their parent, or a person standing in the place of a parent, to perform any job on a farm owned by the parent or the person in place of the parent.
Starting about the age of 11, 12 for sure I normally worked for a couple of neighbor farmers a few days each summer harvesting hay in bales. This was not child abuse no matter what some Washington looney wants to say. I got my fat butt outside working out and made a little pocket money doing it.

But equally important I helped an older neighbor harvest a crop that might have gone to waste. There just weren't any adults who wanted to work. That was before the 'Great Society' so I can not even image what it must be like for farmers now.
 
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:40 AM
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I may be a bail bondsman now, but I proudly hold an agricultural economics degree from the University of Wyoming. A couple of things come to mind with this proposal: How on earth are farm kids supposed to participate in things like 4-H activities, and it would seem to prohibit ranch kids from riding horses.

I'm willing to wager we could go on all day about similar scenarios (No artificial insemination jokes please).
 
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