Webmaster Forum

Go Back   Webmaster Forum > The Webmaster Forums > Tech Talk

Tech Talk Discuss computer issues, tech gadgets and hardware, operating systems, browsers, broadband and wireless, virus, trojan, and spyware help.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Share |
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-20-2011, 04:19 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: 08-20-11
Posts: 1
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Routers of the future?

In order for routers to remain relevant in the wireless home networks of the future, what features/special tricks should they do to empower the user and make the home network better? I have friends who still hack routers to unleash new possibilities...but really who wants to keep doing this? Isn't technology supposed to make life easier?!
 
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2011, 09:15 AM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
It's not a matter of making life easier, it's a matter of providing hardware a home user can afford. You can't stuff 3TB of firmware into 8MB of RAM, and you can't sell a router with 3TB of RAM for $20. People don't buy good, they buy cheap (which is why some pure unadulterated crap is still being sold). If you want good, and hackable, grab all the WRT54GSs you can (if you can still find any).

Not everyone needs a graphic representation of traffic, or repeater mode, or cares whether the web interface is blue or red. You buy the router that has the functions you need.

Besides, even if everyone came out with routers with all the firmware anyone would ever want, someone would think up another function and hack his router to do it. It's not possible to create a router (or any other hackable appliance) that some hacker isn't going to hack.

You want ease of use? The router lets you connect more than one computing device to a single internet connection. What could be easier than taking it out of the box, plugging it into power and an internet connection and forgetting it? 99% of router users have no need to do anything else. Many times, if you find that life is complicated, it's because you want more out of it than the average lump of protoplasm does.
 
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2011, 10:51 AM
The Controversial Coder
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 05-01-06
Location: Manchester; UK
Posts: 2,543
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady3314 View Post
In order for routers to remain relevant in the wireless home networks of the future, what features/special tricks should they do to empower the user and make the home network better? I have friends who still hack routers to unleash new possibilities...but really who wants to keep doing this? Isn't technology supposed to make life easier?!
Generally if you've got people who install custom firmware onto routers to configure SNR and stuff like that such as Tomato firmwire or DD-WRT they're generally going to want to do it whether or not it's a remarkable sucess.

As the previous poster says, you get what you buy. Whether it's a cheap Belkin or TP-Link piece of excrement or a $400 cisco router.
 
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2011, 03:21 PM
agmgroup's Avatar
Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-09-11
Location: Port Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 45
iTrader: 0 / 0%
I'd put myself in the category that im willing to pay a bit more to get a good bit of kit. I find the problem these days is separating the poor equipment from the good - and then - do i need the really good one for my purposes? I'm yet to find a really good review site that covers all of this - im sure its there somewhere. I could see home routers becoming defunct in the future. There will be a way of adapting the phone line with a new type of socket that performs all the same features - easy!
 
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-24-2011, 05:35 AM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Dimpu, a router is wired. Some (many) routers have wireless access points built in, but that's not the router or the switch part. You're buying a box that has a router, a usually-6-port switch [one for the WAP, one for the router] and a WAP. The fact that they all come in the same box doesn't make a router a WAP.

But, unless we go to IPv8, or something larger than IPv6, we're going to need routers. Just add up all the computers in offices that sit behind a single router (mine has about 100 on a single external IP address and we're a very small company) and you'll realize that without routers even IPv6 isn't enough - for now, and computers haven't nearly saturated the world market. Fifty years from now there will be far more computers than there are IPv6 ( or even IPv8 ) addresses.

Last edited by ~CReed; 08-24-2011 at 05:46 AM. Reason: formatting
 
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2011, 04:53 AM
Contributing Member
 
Join Date: 08-13-11
Location: Home?
Posts: 95
iTrader: 0 / 0%
I want simple. Routers now a days have way too many useless options that many users don't understand in the first place. All I want is to be able to turn on/off wireless, change it's name and pass. Be able to disable internal DNS (so my computer can have external IP instead of internal) and a physical restart button (not just reset), not just the one in the admin panel. That's it.
 
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-30-2011, 01:53 AM
The Controversial Coder
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 05-01-06
Location: Manchester; UK
Posts: 2,543
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vollezar View Post
I want simple. Routers now a days have way too many useless options that many users don't understand in the first place. All I want is to be able to turn on/off wireless, change it's name and pass. Be able to disable internal DNS (so my computer can have external IP instead of internal) and a physical restart button (not just reset), not just the one in the admin panel. That's it.
Some people prefer to make the most of their routers, I couldn't imagine not having QoS, or not being able to adjust SNR.
 
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-30-2011, 09:08 AM
Contributing Member
 
Join Date: 08-13-11
Location: Home?
Posts: 95
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Would be interesting to see a router that can be switched between simple and advanced mode. Like some control panels. I rarely have more than one computer hooked up through the router so most of the time I just want to go right through and use my computer's settings to tweak everything.
 
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:07 AM
agmgroup's Avatar
Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-09-11
Location: Port Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 45
iTrader: 0 / 0%
What would you recommend is the best type of router for a home office network with one wireless pc and one wired?
 
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:02 AM
The Controversial Coder
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 05-01-06
Location: Manchester; UK
Posts: 2,543
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Anything will do in reality, as long as it has at least one port and wireless capability. However, personally I would recommend a half-decent router such as the Billion 7800n which offers excellent security capabilities, advanced QoS and SNR tweaking, as well as standard stuff, such as setting up VPN, Port-forwarding etc.
 
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 03:37 PM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
agmgroup, almost any router will work. If you;re not going to be tweaking SNR, (or if you don't know what it means), you don't need that capability. The main consideration is quality. A $20 "wireless router" will usually fail quickly. A good router, if you keep it cool (heat destroys them) will last for many years. (I just junked a 10 year old one that was in a non-ventilated closet. And that's why it failed.)

I stick with Linksys, but d-Link is good too. Billion is a great router - but at 2-3 times the price.

BTW, I'm on a VPN at the moment, using a Linksys WRT54GS. They've been discontinued for a while, but they were in the $50 range. QoS, port forwarding? Any decent router does them. (SNR? Why would the average user care? If the signal is too weak, and you can't stay connected, you call your provider and complain.)
 
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2011, 07:56 AM
AlterMatrixe's Avatar
Contributing Member
 
Join Date: 09-07-11
Posts: 105
iTrader: 0 / 0%
The D-Links I got in Thailand have got built-in lightning protectors. I used to sell a lot of new routers after a heavy thunderstorm. After I started selling those D-Links, I had no more fresh orders after thunderstorms. Good for the customer but not good for the shop.
 
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2011, 02:34 PM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
That's the provider's fault. Where I am, the cable comes to a gas-discharge block before it enters the house. (And the drip loop is 5 turns, which adds to the protection.) I can lose my connection, but unless the cable gets a direct hit, I don't lose equipment. (Nothing made by man can protect against a 1GV, 300KA strike.)
 
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2011, 03:19 PM
The Controversial Coder
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 05-01-06
Location: Manchester; UK
Posts: 2,543
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rukbat View Post
BTW, I'm on a VPN at the moment, using a Linksys WRT54GS. They've been discontinued for a while, but they were in the $50 range. QoS, port forwarding? Any decent router does them. (SNR? Why would the average user care? If the signal is too weak, and you can't stay connected, you call your provider and complain.)
I guess I am quite alone on this forum in getting my moneys worth out of my internet connection. QoS is definitely needed on a shared-network if people game, P2P or such, and British infrastructure means I have to tweak SNR to get a half-decent connection without going with a bad company on fake fibre.
 
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2011, 03:44 PM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
That's why I pay more for my connection, Dan. Excellent tech support (by local people who actually know how a network works), solid signal (never has anything but solid signal except for one time - when their power backup finally failed after hurricane Gloria (they stayed up longer than I did), I lost the signal. Oh - that was about 6 days without power).

Every environment is different. In the US, if you don't get good signal, and you're knowledgeable, you leave your provider. Verizon, the local phone company (they're nationwide) is about the largest, but I wouldn't take their service for free.

So I never have to worry about SNR. But QoS? Any decent router will handle it. I have my wife on max and me on min at home. She games, I download. And the VoIP modem doesn't need that much bandwidth.
 
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2011, 04:27 PM
The Controversial Coder
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 05-01-06
Location: Manchester; UK
Posts: 2,543
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Unfortunately providers like that don't exist where I live in the UK, and the closest one that does charges about 95 a month which is not exactly cheap for what I earn at the moment.
 
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 09-11-2011, 07:54 PM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
There a vacant house on my street. Want to move? Bring your job with you though.
 
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 09-18-2011, 12:39 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: 05-28-11
Posts: 17
iTrader: 0 / 0%
I think a successful router in the future would be one that would be cheap, because who doesn't like cheap? Easy to setup, if they are not, then anyone afraid of anything with wires or that blinks (which is alot of people) will not have access to the internet. But besides that, theres not really anything a router needs that it dos't have already
 
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 09-18-2011, 06:37 PM
Rukbat's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 08-08-11
Location: Long Island, NY, USA
Posts: 287
iTrader: 0 / 0%
"Cheap" is nice. "Easy to set up" is nice. "Works" is even better, and $20 wireless routers don't. But $50 wireless routers are relatively cheap and they're easy to set up. (You plug it into the wall, plug the internet connection into it and ... oh, that's it.)
 
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2011, 11:49 PM
timmy.norris's Avatar
Contributing Member
Latest Blog:
None

 
Join Date: 09-20-11
Posts: 167
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Got myself a Belkin Wireless G Plus MIMO Router for $40, its cheap and very easy to setup.
__________________
Do you know how to get australian vpn connection or learn how to bypass blocked websites?
 
Reply With Quote
Go Back   Webmaster Forum > The Webmaster Forums > Tech Talk

Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How easy is it to hack Wireless routers? gazraz Tech Talk 12 08-31-2011 11:53 PM
What will be the future of SEO? digitalhorizonsuk SEO Forum 28 10-02-2010 04:47 PM
What is the future of seo/sem jacks smith SEO Forum 22 12-27-2009 08:17 PM
Wireless Routers Will Kill Us All cldnails Tech Talk 20 02-28-2008 10:03 AM


V7N Network
Get exposure! V7N I Love Photography V7N SEO Blog V7N Directory


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:09 AM.
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
Copyright © 2003 - 2014 Escalate Media




Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.